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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 27, 2017 3:00am-4:01am PDT

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bullets fly inside a cincinnati nightclub. [ sirens ] at least one person is dead, many more are injured in a horrific gun fight. >> people were just going to have a good time and ended up getting shot. also tonight, chaos on the vegas strip. a standoff with a gunman forces a hotel evacuation. bandits wearing animal masks rob a store. in a new tweet, president trump blames conservative republicans for their defeat on health care. and severe storms demolish homes in arkansas and a church in louisiana. where is the dangerous weather headed tonight? this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight
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news." i'm elaine quijano. like many american cities, cincinnati, ohio, is plagued by gun violence. sunday morning, inside a crowded nightclub, one person was killed and 15 injured when a gunfight broke out at the club cameo. demarco morgan is there. >> reporter: hundreds of people crowded into klum cameo found themselves running for their lives when a fight broke out shortly after 1:00 a.m. and several men pulled out guns and started firing. >> and my understanding is that last night they had security on scene. they were wanding people to determine if they had firearms. however, at least more than one individual was able to get inside the establishment with a firearm. >> reporter: 27-year-old o'brian spikes of smith, pictured here, was killed, more than a dozen
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shot. >> i ask all of cincinnati to pray for the victims and their families, especially those fighting to cling to life. >> reporter: unlike oerltd's pulse nightclub, the cincinnati mayor says this shooting is not terrorism related. >> however, to the victims, what difference does it make? they've been terrorized by gun violence. innocent victims. it's important for everyone to understand people were just going to have a good time, and ended up getting shot. >> reporter: the saturday night party at cameo is known as grown and sexy night. the party usually goes until 4:00 a.m. the crowd was mostly 18 and 19-year-olds. the club has a history of violence. there was a shooting in 2015 and a stabbing just a few weeks ago. >> we need people to have courage, to come forward and identify the shooter or shooters. in this case. we must solve this crime and bring the shooters to justice.
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>> reporter: cincinnati police are on the hunt tonight for more than one shooter and treat thing case as a homicide investigation. elaine, now comes the task of finding out how several guns made it inside past security guards at the entrance. >> demarco morgan, thank you. there was chaos on the las vegas strip this weekend. on saturday, a standoff with a gunman forced the evacuation of the cosmopolitan hotel. earlier, bandits wearing animal masks robbed a jewelry store. mireya villarreal has the latest details. >> subject is on the second level. >> reporter: as las vegas s.w.a.t. teams moved in on the double decker bus, snipers were stationed nearby. assistant sheriff tom roberts -- >> about 11:00, we got reports of shots fired. as soon as we came here, there was people coming off the bus. >> wearing sunglasses and a light colored shirt on, that was the shooter. >> reporter: witnesses say the
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suspect pulled out a gun and started shooting, leaving one person dead and another wounded. cosmopolitan guests that stayed inside captured this video from high above. >> something just blew up on the bus. >> the gentleman, they're going compressions, cpr and tactical came in. >> reporter: four hours ago, one man was arrested and faces several charges. >> we did take the suspect into custody after negotiatoring teod to him, he surrendered peacefully. >> reporter: sin city gave tourists more social media material. mike wicks was staying at the hotel. >> it's very strange, because last night we heard sirens going
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off and this morning everyone was telling us the bilagio was robbed. >> reporter: police are investigating both incidents. we have also been able to confirm the man killed on the bus was a tourist from montana. police are still not releasing a motive in this case. >> mireya villarreal, thank you. president trump is casting blame on conservatives within his own party for last week's stunning defeat of his health care bill. the latest round of the blame game came on twitter sunday morning. the president's chief of staff, meanwhile, is making it clear that mr. trump will be seeking support from moderate democrats for his upcoming legislative battles. errol barnett is at the white house. >> i'm not going to speak badly about anybody within the party. >> reporter: president trump avoided any criticism of fellow republicans friday when he reacted to the defeat of his party's obamacare replacement plan. but today on twitter, he suggested conservatives in the freedom caucus saved planned
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parenthood and obamacare. it follows a tweet on saturday when the president urged his 27 million follow hers to watch fox news host janeane pyro. he opened with this. >> paul ryan needs to step down as speaker of the house. >> reporter: trump's chief of staff said the president is a friend of the host. >> i'm just telling you the truth, there was no preplanning here. this is more of a personal relationship. the president helping out a friend. >> reporter: priebus said the president is moving on. >> we're moving on to tax reform. we've got the budget coming up. i think it's more or less a warning shot that we're willing to talk to anyone. we always have been. >> we're all quite in the dark on this. >> reporter: meanwhile, there's infighting among members of the house intelligence committee. adam schiff slammed devin nunes for briefing president trump on possible surveillance of his
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transition team. >> we can't have a credible investigation, if the chairman takes the information he has seen to the white house and doesn't share it with his committee. >> the commander in chief cannot be briefed by the chairperson of the house intel committee on a matter that has nothing to do with the fbi investigation that i don't know what they can talk about. >> reporter: today, the president visited his golf property in virginia for a second day in a row. the white house says he held three meetings but no further details that been provided. >> errol barnett, thank you. the senate judiciary committee is set to vote on the nomination of neil gorsuch, president trump's pick for the supreme court. the full senate is expected to vote next month. they're also voting to confirm rod rosenstein as assistant attorney general.
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the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,
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the world's youngest nation, south sudan, gabed independence from sudan in 2011. but since 2013, sit's been embroiled in civil war. the conflict has created one of the world's largest humanitarian crises, with 1.6 million refugees. the war has also led to accusations of mass rape, in addition to a man made famine that has scores on the brink of starvation. >> reporter: 11-year-old james is so malnourished he walks like an old man. his thin legs look as if they will break every time he takes a step. "my parts are de s -- part pa is the only thing he said when
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he arrived. he's severely traumatized after watching his parents shot in front of him. he barely eats the food he so desperately needs. >> he cries and says he wants the mother and father. >> reporter: now there is a new weapon -- starvation. 1 million children are in desperate need of food, but the fierce fighting immediates aid workers cannot reach the areas that need it most. there are critical food shortages now throughout the country. >> what can we do? a school-age child is supposed to be in school. >> reporter: today, this 6-month-old was admitted. she weighs less than nine pounds and when her stick-like arms are measured, it shows up red on the tape measure. the marker says red.
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what does that mean? >> the child is severely mall four irn nouris nourished. >> reporter: here, at least they will get at least some food and medical care. like this 2-year-old, who is so weak, he doesn't even open his eyes to register the trick of a needle. hunger has sucked the spirit out of him. just like this war has sucked the hope from this young country. violence broke out saturday in a pro trump rally in huntington beach, california. counterprotesters used pepper spray on the marchers, who responded with punches and kicks. two people were treated tat scene for minor injuries. four people were arrested. severe thunderstorms are sweeping across the south this weekend. this is what remains of the assembly of god church in
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northern louisiana, destroyed by powerful winds. severe storm watches are in effect across several states tonight, with the threat of heavy rain, damaging winds and hail. another arrest has been made in connection to last week's deadly attack in london. a 30-year-old man is in custody in birmingham, england on suspicion of preparation of terrorist acts. police have also revealed the attacker sent a message on an app just before his rampage, but the message is encrypted. in iraq, the battle for mosul wages on. iraqi forces are trying the drive isis out of densely populated western mosul. the terror group's last stronghold in iraq. this weekend, pentagon officials confirmed the u.s. was involved in an air strike in mosul that is under investigation. jonathan vigliotti is following this. >> reporter: the high rate of civilian briefs put on hold the u.s.-backed offensive to retake mosul.
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the fighting has resumed today, but iraqi officials say they're weighing new plans and tactics. the decision came after at least 100 people were killed by a huge explosion, with some eyewitnesss blaming a coalition air strike. most of the victims in the march 17th incident were families seeking shelter from the war between isis and the u.s. backed iraqi government. u.s. officials this weekend confirmed the military did launch an air strike in the area on the same day. but they said they're still investigating if their air strike was to blame. adding to the ongoing mystery, today iraqi forces said at least one of the buildings that was destroyed appeared to have been brought down by booby traps planted by ice. as iraqi forces fight to recapture mosul, weeding out the militants has become difficult and often times deadly. it's believed 600,000 civilians
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are still trapped in the cross fire. >> jonathan, thanks. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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no matter who was in there last... protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to four weeks. lysol, what it takes to protect. the newly restored shrine surrounding what is believed to be the tomb of jesus was unveiled last week in jerusalem. centuries of candle smoke had left the shrine almost black. the restoration took months of delicate work. here again is jonathan vigliotti. >> reporter: a pinhole of light illuminates the newly restored shrine, protecting what christians believe to be the entrance to the cave where jesus was buried. the refurbished holy site was reopened to the public this morning, just in time for easter
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in a small ceremony attended by religious leaders. the ornate building sits in the center of the church, one of the world's oldest, located in jerusalem's old city. millions visit the site each year, and all that foot traffic, along with time, took its toll with parts coming loose and warnings that it was structurally unsound. the over $3.5 million restoration began in the fall. one of the most dramatic moments came when the cave itself was revealed for the first time in 700 years. historians found what is believed to be the bench where jesus' body lay. > it was really important to see the bench, very flat and almost complete from the right to the left, almost for the shape that one man can stay on it. >> reporter: the entrance to the bench has been resealed with
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marble, but a small window has been added so visitors can see a section of the cave's original wall for themselves. the world monument fund, a nonprofit in new york, helped raise the funds. the pain staking work isn't over just yet. now money is beingor another round of restorations to fix drainage and sewage pipes built around the tomb. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, london. still ahead, the plight of the bumblebee, now in danger in the u.s. hey, searching for a great used yeah! you got it. just say show me millions of used cars for sale at the all new carfax.com.
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rewrite the rules. always. makewith instant moisture utes from k-y ultragel. not long ago about half the country was buzzing with rusty patch bumblebees. these were garden variety, busy bees. this week, they became the first to land on the u.s. endangered species list. mark strassman has our report. >> reporter: in eastern tennessee's great smoky mountains national park, the only place you can now see a rusty patch bumblebee is inside
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this drawer. part of the park's nature collection. >> these two boxes here. >> reporter: becky nichols. >> we haven't seen them here in the park since 2001. >> reporter: not a single one? >> no. >> reporter: rusty patched bumblebees, important poll th they -- pollinators for tomatoes, nest underground. they have a range that stretched into the upper midwest and northeast. they face many threats. >> loss of habitat, pesticide, diseases. all of these things contribute to the overall decline of pollinators. >> reporter: bumblebees, honeybees, butterflies. in all, about 40% of pollinator species now face extinction. about 75% of the world's food supply depends at least partly on what they do. professor sidney cameron from
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the university of illinois. >> one in every third bite of food is pollinated by bees. a huge factor is the bumblebee itself. a lot of our food is dependent upon these bees. if that's not important, i don't know what is. >> reporter: but nichols sees new hope. >> the first bumblebee to be listed on the endangered species list. hopefully it will be a wakeup call that we need to pay close attention to what we're doing with the pollinators. >> reporter: experts say with help, these bees could reappear in parks like this. mark strassman, cbs news, gatlinburg, tennessee. when we return, rescue dogs paying back the kindness. ,,
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we end tonight in los angeles, where an animal shelter is giving disabled dogs a new life with a new set of wheels. and ben tracy shows how the dogs are paying back the kindness. >> reporter: this little terrier used to go by the name "cry baby." it made sense, given how much pain he had endured.
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>> he was hit by a car. his back was broken. >> reporter: he was in tough shape. >> bad shape. >> reporter: his two hind legs were paralyzed. and after surgery, his family no longer wanted him. >> it's okay, buddy. >> reporter: but susan fulcher did. she gave him a new home and a new name, presley. it's something she's done more than 25 times, through her organization. >> there it is. >> reporter: but this isn't just about keeping these dogs alive. >> good boy. >> reporter: it's about helping them really live. >> that's what we do, and we do it well. >> reporter: she fits each one of them with a custom doggy wheelchair, with just two working legs, they're now hon a roll. what kind of reaction do these dogs have when you put those wheels on for the first time? >> they immediately take off. we only have one dog that it took me, i don't know how many times, to get her to love. that would be lovie gaga, the one in the pink wheelchair.
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>> reporter: she's a bit of a diva and probably doesn't know her idle wheels cost about $500. after some training, these rescues have become therapy dogs. they visit schools to provide stress relief for kids with learning disabilities, behavioral problems and autism. >> it's terrific and magnificent how they actually have a purpose in life after they're hurt. they get love that they actually deserve. >> reporter: you have given them this second chance. do you enjoy seeing them give back to other people this >> oh, yeah. absolutely. in this world right now, we really need to think about just giving more, caring more. >> reporter: and despite limitations, we are capable of so much more. ben tracy, cbs news, los angeles. >> that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back us with a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. president trump is casting blame on conservatives within his own party for last week's stunning defeat of his health care bill. the latest round of the blame game came on twitter sunday morning. the president's chief of staff, meanwhile, is making it clear that mr. trump will be seeking support from moderate democrats for his upcoming legislative battles. errol barnett is at the white house. >> i'm not going to speak badly about anybody within the party. >> reporter: president trump avoided any criticism of fellow republicans friday when he reacted to the defeat of his party's obamacare replacement plan. but today on twitter, he suggested that conservatives in the freedom caucus saved planned parenthood and obamacare.
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it follows a tweet on saturday when the president urged his 27 million followers to watch fox news host janeane pirro. she opened with this. >> paul ryan needs to step down. as speaker of the house. >> reporter: trump's chief of staff said the president is a friend of the host. e and does not endorse her sentiment. >> i'm just telling you the truth, there was no preplanning here. this is more of a personal relationship. the president helping out a friend. >> reporter: priebus said the president is moving on. >> we're moving on to tax reform. we've got the budget coming up. i think it's more or less a warning shot that we're willing to talk to anyone. we always have been. >> we're all quite in the dark on this. >> reporter: meanwhile, there's infighting among members of the house intelligence committee. ranking member and democrat adam schiff slammed devin nunes for briefing president trump on possible surveillance of his transition team. >> we can't have a credible
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investigation if one of the members, indeed the chairman takes only information he has seen to the white house and doesn't share it with his own committee. >> reporter: trey gowdy. >> if the commander in chief cannot be briefed by the chairperson of the house intel committee on a matter that has nothing to do with the fbi investigation, then i don't know what they can talk about. >> reporter: today, the president visited his golf property in virginia for a second day in a row. the white house says he held three meetings but no further details have been provided. >> errol barnett, thank you. the senate judiciary committee is set to vote on the nomination of judge neil gorsuch president trump's pick for the supreme court. the full senate is expected to vote next month. the committee is also voting on whether to confirm rod rosenstein as deputy attorney general. if confirmed, he would likely oversee any investigation into alleged russian interference in the presidential election after attorney general jeff sessions recused himself.
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the investigation into russian interference in the election, as well as possible kremlin ties to white house officials, will play out behind closed doors tomorrow. fbi director james comey and others will testify in a closed session of the house judiciary committee. the public hearing was canceled at the behest of the republican chairman. that didn't sit too well with the ranking democrat, congressman adam schiff. he spoke on "face the nation." >> the chairman has to make a decision whether to act as a surrogate for the white house, or to lead an independent and credible investigation. i hope he chooses the latter. the country really needs to have an independent, credible investigation in the house. and we had that up until and through monday, where i think that the house process went off the rails was with that venture by the chairman to the white house. you simply can't run a credible investigation that way. i'm going to do everything i can
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to get this back on track, and i implore our chairman and the speak tore rededicate themselves to a serious and bipartisan investigation. we know that russia was involved in hacking our democracy. we know that the evidence or information is sufficient to warrant an fbi investigation of this. we're trying to do as much of this as we can in the public eye transparentally. some of it will have to be done in closed session. but it demands both parties work together. we need the chairman to decide that's what his object is, as well. >> congressman, there has been a report from cnn that wednesday night, that the fbi was looking into collusion with the russians and the trump campaign in terms of spreading information about hillary clinton's campaign. do you have any information to back that up? >> i'm not sure that i can comment on that. i can say that i think the investigate thun thion that the
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talked about at our monday hearing is justified. i think that we owe it to the country to do this in a credible way. i would make one final point, john. i do think the events of this week call out the need for an independent commission quite separate and apart than what we do in congress. there are enough questions that have been raised where i think the establishment of that commission would give the country a lot of confidence that at least one body was doing this in a way that was completely removed from any political considerations. one another one vladamir putin's political enemies has turned up dead, gunned down on the streets of kiev as he was set to testify in a treason investigation. anna werner has details. >> reporter: ukrainian officials describe the shooting as an execution and accused russia of state terrorism. it's just the latest incident of violence of people critical of
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moscow. denis voronenkov was gunned down in kiev. prosecutors say the motive remains unclear. but ukrainian officials believe moscow was behind the attack of the former russian politician, who became a vocal critic of the kremlin. he was scheduled to give testimony at the ukraine's prosecutor's office, the purpose of which was not immediately clear. in an interview last week, voronenkov said he was not concerned for his safety and was not going to hide. the ukraine government did not agree, providing him with a bodyguard who was injured in thursday's firefight after shooting and killing voronenkov's attacker. voronenkov joins a growing list of people, all critical of the russian government, and/or president vladamir putin who have ended up dead. including former russian spy alexander litvenko, who drank tea laced with radioactive
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pullonium. and this journalist, who was critical of russia's human rights policies, who was kidnapped and killed in 2009. >> this was retaliation for my political activities. >> reporter: this russian government critic is now recovering from a second alleged poisoning by the putin regime. he spoke to "60 minutes" about his first alleged attack. >> i was at one point connected i think to eight different artificial life support machines and doctors told my wife there's only a 5% chance i'll survive. >> reporter: he survived both incidents, but his friend and opposition leader to the putin government was shot and killed near the kremlin in 2015. >> people shouldn't be killed for their political activity and because they happen to disagree with the government. >> reporter: russia denies any involvement in both the poisoning of karmuza and shooting of voronenkov.
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the sap is running in new england. that means it's time to brew up some maple syrup. it's a $300 million a year industry. don dahler has the story of one family who brought their little family business into the 21st century. >> reporter: every year sugar farmers hike into the woods and tap thousands of trees. it takes up to 60 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup. the ultimate renewal resource, maple trees produce sugar four to six weeks a year. but it only takes a taste to know that's a sweet deal. how old do you think these things are? >> 100 years old. >> reporter: for 75 winters, dave's family has been making maple syrup. >> right there looks like a good spot to me, but that's just my guess. we never know.
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>> reporter: this is how he used to do it when he was a boy. with hand drills and hammers, horses and sleds, and thousands of buckets that had to be emptied multiple times a day if the sap was really flowing. sounds like hard work. >> it was. there it comes. >> reporter: there she goes. >> get a taste of it. >> reporter: the older the tree, the sweeter the sap. older is better? >> yes. >> reporter: in the tree business. >> yes. you hear it? that's what i would call an average flow. it would be going ping, ping, ping if it was faster. that's the sound of money dropping into the bottom of the pale. >> reporter: how many trees do you think you were working back then? >> 800 to 1,000 trees. >> reporter: vermont is the largest maple syrup producer in the u.s. with every fourth tree in the state being a maple, there's plenty of resources for big and small businesses, which produce
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more than 1.3 gallons of syrup a year. they have always been primarily dairy farmers. >> it's been a science tapping the trees. >> reporter: but a few years ago, dave's nephew took their syrup operation from hobby to big business. >> it was a side business for a long time. now it's more of an income producer for your family. >> right. it's important to us. >> reporter: drills and hammered replaced by miles of plastic tuned, tapped into 6200 trees. it's just pouring in there. that's a lot of sap. >> it's a lot of sap. >> reporter: high tech equipment takes the clear sap, boils it down, which produces the liquid sere r syrup. >> we produce about 40 gallons an hour with this rig. and total of around 3,000 to 3500 a year. >> reporter: and before you
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modernized the system, what were you producing? >> somewhere around 300 to 500 gallons of syrup. >> reporter: that's a big difference. according to a recent study, maple farmers are worried about climate change. winters in vermont are getting warmer earlier. >> march is when we would tap the trees. now we should tap the trees in get more of the days when it's above freezing during the daytime and freezing at night for sap flows. >> reporter: tapping earlier means longer, more profitable seasons, but a warm snap can shut it down quickly. still, when the sap is flowing and the family is working almost around the clock, they always take the time to count their blessings and thank the humble maple tree, the gift that keeps on giving. for someone that doesn't live up here and do this, what is the best thing about this business? >> the warm days, seeing the sap flow out of the tree.
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let life in. ♪ ♪ five-second rule protection. new lysol kitchen pro eliminates 99.9% of bacteria without any harsh chemical residue. ♪ lysol. what it takes to protect. actor danny devito made his mark in tv and later movies. now for the first time ever, he's opening on broadway. he got the lead in arthur miller's "the price." he took martha teichner on a stroll through his hometown. >> let's go. new york city, baby.
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let's go this way. >> reporter: here's just a hint of how famous and loved danny devito is worldwide. >> where are you from? >> scotland. >> very nice. >> i'm from london. >> you're from london. okay. i'm from jersey. we're going to go through the tundra. this was my pal, so i would sit here, you know, hot summer nights. >> reporter: leading me on a tour of the new york city of his acting school days 50 years ago led to a polite feeding frenzy. >> you got it? israel, okay. that's over that way, right? i don't come out a lot. but it doesn't bother me. >> hey, nice to see y'all. let's do it. i go to times square, it's like a chicken with a bunch of piranha. they eat it up. i'm like a little dumpling.
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>> looking for mr. louie depalma. >> that's me. >> reporter: howlouie depalma i "taxi" made him a star in 1978. >> you're a yellow bellied, mealy mouthed chicken. >> reporter: but since then, there have been so many others. >> you want my watch? >> reporter: scene stealers, all. >> take it, go ahead. it's a rolex. >> reporter: no matter how sleazy -- >> i'm about to have a close encounter with a cattle prod. >> reporter: how villainous even. devito somehow manages to make them irresistible and funny. >> my name is julius and i'm your twin brother. >> obviously. >> reporter: how would you
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describe your sense of humor? >> it's unique. i like a good banana peel. i like all that. i was raised on the three stooges, which is a little cruel. so it's in a way dark. >> reporter: on the face of it, we're not someone necessarily you would predict that would become an actor and a-list star and director and producer. >> you don't know. yeah, i never thought of that. i went to the movies religiously every weekend to escape from life. and you could imagine, you always wanted to be that guy up there. everybody thinks that when they go to the movies. >> reporter: after high school, he worked in his sister any's beauty salon. yes, doing hair. angie sent him to learn makeup, which is how he ended up at the american academy of new york arts. >> that building right there is where i went to school. >> reporter: he discovered he
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liked performing. being short never got in his way. >> i never did not go for an audition because i didn't think i looked like the person. i think of all the characters i've ever played. they're always about five feet tall. >> reporter: one of his favorites was the penguin in "batman returns." >> batman. ahhhhh! >> reporter: i think you should have gotten an oscar for the penguin. >> i had to sit in the makeup trailer for three hours. sometimes i had to wear flippers. >> reporter: how do you eat lunch with flippers on. >> eating lunch is easy, somebody can feed you. but there are other things you have to do with your hands. >> start the revolution, something. >> it's a 90-year-old yiddish man. there's a lot of layers on this character that are unique for
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me. >> reporter: at 72, danny devito is making his broadway debut in arthur miller's "the price." >> i shouldn't have come. there's too much for me. i thought there would be a few pieces. this is way too much for me. >> reporter: circling back to the stage where he began. if you've been doing eight shows a week, does that feed you? >> no, no. it's like good. you want more. it's a good idea to do 10, 12 shows a week. >> reporter: co-star mark ruffalo, a fan and now a friend, was in awe. >> it's like a girl, i mean -- >> i go right in here. >> reporter: this is right on the stage. wow. >> sit down right there. this is my script. >> reporter: what kind of stuff did you write in the margin? >> all kinds of stuff how to go,
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what you want to try stuff in the script, what you want to try. >> reporter: how did an italian get into the mindset of a geriatrics jew? danny devito headed for barney green grass. >> hey, gary. >> reporter: his favorite new york deli. >> i used to come a couple times a week, just to sit in, listen to people. you know, it's good. >> reporter: and you got ideas for solomon -- >> it's good to daydream your way into it. >> reporter: and of course -- >> you want to try those? >> sure, why not? >> reporter: a good excuse to eat. >> just like grandma girdy used to make. bree's grand mother was the best. >> reporter: that's devito's wife and sometimes co-star. the very funny, four-time emmy winner rhea pearlman. >> i know you didn't, but
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obviously you did. >> i did not glue my hat to the head. the hat shrunk. >> reporter: together since 1971, they have three grown children. and were, until recently, considered one of the most stable couples in hollywood. everybody says, oh, are danny and rhea pearlman still together and i read you're getting a divorce. >> we're not getting a divorce, but we separated, yeah. >> reporter: she was here for the opening. >> absolutely. we're very close. we've been friends for 40 something years. >> reporter: for people who love both of you -- >> we love each other. >> reporter: at this stage in his life and career, what danny devito doesn't want to do is slow down or play it safe. >> where's the robes? >> reporter: no clearer evidence of that is his role as frank
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reynolds in the bizarre black comedy "it's always sunny in philadelphia." >> these guys put me in like situations, themselves, too. it's like "i love lucy" on acid. it's really far out. >> reporter: example, this infamous couch scene. >> sew me into the couch. >> reporter: which went viral on youtube. >> it's like a big halibut being birthed, just coming out like naked, greasy from sweat. it was just amazing. >> can't breathe. >> i had to do it several times. i came out, kept greasing myself up more so i could come out faster. i've been slimed, i've fallen out of windows. i've had amnesia. god, it's fun. and it's my trampoline, you want to get on it? >> reporter: so the novel way danny devito warms up in his
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dressing room before every performance shouldn't surprise,,
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a wound ed warrior from suburban new york is on a new mission. steve hartman found his story on the road. ♪ >> reporter: here come the latest graduates of the suffolk county police academy on long island, new york. makes it through seven months of police training is a big achievement for anyone. but for this recruit, today's accomplishment orders on the miraculous. >> i just got chills. you hear the pipe band and this beat is going through your body and having this pride within you, knowing that you finally completed the dream that you
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didn't know if you would be able yourself. >> reporter: 28-year-old matias ferreira used to be a marine, and in 2011, he stepped on an ied and lost both legs from the knee down. it was a nightmare. he emigrated to america from uruguay at the age of 6. not long after, he saw a marine in dress blues and decided that's what i want to be. his dream was to be a marine for life until he lost his legs. >> i started looking into the police department seeing if they would take me. i spent numerous hours googling police officers with prosthetics and i couldn't find anything. i'm going in blind, i don't know what's going to happen. >> reporter: as best anyone could tell, there had never been a double amputee police officer. but he applied like everyone else. really the only special
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accommodation he wanted was that he not get any special accommodations. >> i feel like somebody helped me, it wouldn't have been fair to me or the police officers behind me. >> reporter: so he went through the exact same training. some in the department were curious if we health trying to apprehend a suspect, could he get up? so that answered that. today, he not only graduated, he graduated class president. wife and daughter clearly proud. he told me when he lost those legs, he knew if he worked hard, another door would open. and here he is, on the glorious other side of that threshold. steve hartman, on the road, in brentwood, new york. >> that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. -- captions by vitac -- captioning funded by cbs captioning funded by cbs mo , march 27th, 2017. this is the it's monday, march 27th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." president trump is moving past the health care collapse but not before some finger-pointing as he goes after republicans for failing to repeal and replace obamacare. hail hammers parts of the south and at least one funnel cloud is spotted as severe weather makes its way through texas. >> for the win. >> and the final four is set in the ncaa men's basketball tournament, and

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